UNC Kenan-Flagler Insights

Emotional intelligence: Can companies really feel their way to success?

November 7, 2013 By kfblogadmin1 Emotional Intelligence

The following is an excerpt from a white paper by Lauren Garris, client relationship manager, UNC Kenan-Flagler Executive Development. It has been nearly 25 years since Peter Solovay and John D. Mayer first used the term “emotional intelligence” to describe a different kind of intelligence many business leaders believe is essential to achieving success in the workplace. Unlike many other business trends that have come and gone, emotional intelligence—an intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions and to use that information to guide one’s thinking and action—still has legs. Business leaders continue to use the term and value it as a key employment factor. There is also evidence that HR and talent management professionals who Read More

HR’s role in linking personal, employment and leadership branding

October 7, 2013 By kfblogadmin1 CanStock_ExecDev_PersonalBranding

The following is an excerpt from a white paper by Meena Dorr, director of career and professional development, UNC Kenan-Flagler Executive MBA programs. Although a cover letter and resume are still important in the hiring process, a new hurdle recently has been added to the mix. Thanks to the rise of social media, recruiters and hiring managers are increasingly checking out the candidate’s LinkedIn profile or other personal or professional social media site, or searching for job samples on YouTube or SlideShare. This new step in the process led to a renewed emphasis on the importance of personal branding and, conversely, because applicants can now find more information about a potential employer than ever before online, a renewed emphasis on the importance Read More

Tips for the job search from LinkedIn’s John Hill

October 4, 2013 By kfblogadmin1 20130910_LinkedIn_John_Hill_036

LinkedIn’s higher education evangelist John Hill visited UNC Kenan-Flagler to help students, faculty, staff and alumni learn how to effectively use LinkedIn’s powerful networking tools. Here are his tips for the job search. Get direction. LinkedIn’s alumni tool gives you the ability to filter alumni by location, company, industry or position, allowing you to see where other UNC Kenan-Flagler grads are employed. If you need direction when setting career goals, look at profiles of business leaders to see their career trajectory – you can use this as a guide towards achieving your own professional goals. Be the first to know about a job opening. If you’ve got your eye on a position at a specific company, use LinkedIn’s advanced search Read More

Profile tips from LinkedIn’s John Hill

October 4, 2013 By kfblogadmin1 20130910_LinkedIn_John_Hill_076_Crop

LinkedIn’s higher education evangelist John Hill visited UNC Kenan-Flagler to help students, faculty, staff and alumni learn how to effectively use LinkedIn’s powerful networking tools. Here are his tips for creating an effective profile. Profiles should not be a duplicate of your resume. Instead, ensure that your resume and LinkedIn profile complement each other. Use the “summary” field to let employers know what makes you tick. Use the “interests” section to share your passions and interests outside of work. This gives prospective employers a glimpse into your personality through information that’s not on your resume. Every word of your LinkedIn profile is searchable; use this to your advantage. Showcase your portfolio. LinkedIn allows you to upload rich media such as Read More

How to add notes to your connections’ profiles on LinkedIn

October 4, 2013 By kfblogadmin1

One of LinkedIn’s hidden gems is its ability to act as a customer relationship management (CRM) tool – an incredibly useful (yet underutilized) feature for business professionals and job seekers. Below is a step-by-step guide to adding notes to your connections’ profiles on LinkedIn. Log into LinkedIn and click “network” then “contacts” Click on the name of the contact you want to add notes to Click on “edit details” Click the area where you want to add information or notes and input the information Click “save changes” To export contact information and notes, click “export connections” and follow the prompts to save as a CSV (Excel) file. This capability is available to first- level connections. Any information that you enter Read More

Powering your bottom line through employee engagement

September 5, 2013 By kfblogadmin1 Exec Dev Sept 2013

The following is an excerpt from a white paper by Kimberly Schaufenbuel, director of UNC Executive Development. Some of the biggest concerns CEOs say they grapple with on a regular basis with are operational excellence, innovation, risk, the regulatory environment, and the global economy. Addressing those concerns effectively takes human capital, the “people thread” that is the key to helping organizations compete and win. It takes more than bodies, though, to gain the competitive advantage organizations need to positively impact their bottom lines. They need fully engaged, motivated employees. Unfortunately, engaged employees are a rare find these days. A recent Gallup poll found that more than 70 percent of American workers are either actively or passively disengaged from their work. Read More

Identifying High-Potential Talent in the Workplace

August 6, 2013 By kfblogadmin1 Identifying High-Potential Talent in the Workplace

The following is an excerpt from a white paper by Kip Kelly, Director of Marketing & Business Development for UNC Executive Development. The cornerstone to an organization’s growth-from-within strategy is the identification of high-potential talent, yet HR and talent management professionals consistently report that existing processes and programs are lacking or nonexistent. A recent leadership survey conducted by the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School, for example, found that while many talent management professionals reported a high demand for high-potential talent, nearly half (47 percent) said their current high-potential talent pool did not meet their anticipated needs, and 65 percent said they were only slightly or moderately confident in their organization’s ability to fill mission-critical roles. High-potential employees have Read More

How to Build a Resilient Organizational Culture

June 3, 2013 By Heather Harreld profit

The following is an excerpt from a white paper by Marion White, director of UNC Executive Development. A 2012 Towers Watson study found that in most organizations, only 35 percent of employees said they were engaged. In other words, 65 percent of employees have mentally checked out, causing productivity, innovation, and creativity to plummet. While this is never good news for employers, the timing could not be more critical as organizations across the globe continue to struggle to survive. Thought leaders are increasingly calling today’s turbulent business world a “VUCA” environment—one that is volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous. To succeed in this environment, organizations must be more adaptive and agile than ever before—they must be resilient. Organizations that lack resilience—that Read More

How a lack of sleep can affect employee ethics

May 24, 2013 By Heather Harreld sleepywoman

This is a story from the latest version of UNC Business magazine. To read the entire issue, download the iPad app. By Heather Harreld Can a lack of sleep make you more likely to be unethical at work? That is the question that intrigued Michael Christian, assistant professor of organizational behavior at UNC Kenan- Flagler, and prompted him to study the effects of sleep deprivation in the workplace. What he found about deviant behavior — hostility toward customers, stealing and other unethical actions — may surprise you. Christian studied the effects of sleep deprivation on nurses at a large medical center and on undergraduate volunteers in a laboratory setting. He found that those who are sleep deprived — defined as Read More

Leadership: When to lead by empowerment vs. when to be directive

May 20, 2013 By Heather Harreld teamwork

This is a story from the latest version of UNC Business magazine. To read the entire issue, download the iPad app.  By Heather Harreld Empowering leadership — the practice of sharing power with subordinates and allowing them to collectively make decisions — has long been touted as better for performance than a more directive approach. But is an empowering leadership style always better when managing teams? It depends on the nature and timeline of the project, according to new research from Matthew Pearsall, assistant professor of organizational behavior at UNC Kenan-Flagler. While researchers have looked at the effects of both empowering and directive leadership styles separately, Pearsall wanted to directly compare the approaches at the same time. He studied 60 Read More